Features 10/30/09

RED RIBBON WEEK’S GOAL: HEALTH

redribbonBy Sarah Hlavaty
Features Editor

  Friday Night Live along, with LHS, is celebrating Red Ribbon Week next week. Red Ribbon Week is the oldest and largest drug prevention and healthy lifestyle campaign in the United States.
The program was started in 1985 to commemorate Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, an officer for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, who died fighting the battle against illegal drug trafficking in Mexico. Today, Red Ribbon Week is celebrated in memory of Special Agent Camarena and promotes a drug and alcohol free lifestyle. Sue Gressel, Friday Night Live’s coordinator, shared with The Roar some of the fun activities taking place next week.
  Gressel said there will be many free giveaways, including the traditional red bracelets, but the group will have to keep an eye on the free candy because of the school’s new health policy.
  One of the new activities this year will consist of giving each class the opportunity to paint a class wall on the west side of the school. Five students at a time from each class will be given two hours every day next week to paint designs on their class’s wall and create school spirit.
  “The point of this activity, “ Gressel said, “is to beautify our school and raise the students school pride.” Gressel said FNL is hoping to jazz up this year’s Red Ribbon Week, so it has a more mature, high school feel.DSC01626
  “Our goal is to promote a healthy, drug and alcohol free lifestyle and to do it in a fun way.” The club is planning enjoyable and informative festivities for the week. The daily announcements and bulletin board will have interesting facts about drug and alcohol use, and FNL will be putting up creative anti-drug and alcohol posters up around the school.
  The English classes will also view short videos about different drugs and alcohol–what they can do to people and stories of those who have been consumed by their addictions.
  Red Ribbon Week’s main organizer, Jillian Lane, said she’s “totally stoked” for next week and hopes to really create school spirit and open the students’ eyes to what really happens when they use things like drugs and alcohol.
  “I just really want them to see how bad these things are and to give them some heads up for the future,” she said.
  Lane said one of her favorite things about Red Ribbon Week is the red pledge bracelets FNL will be handing out to the students. She said the bracelets are a promise to lead a healthy lifestyle and to stay alcohol and drug free.

HISTORY OF ALL HALLOWS EVE

halloween candyBy Molly Beaver
Roar Reporter

  Halloween is celebrated throughout the United States, but few people ask where it came from. Halloween is the result of many celebrations and the merging of several cultures. The Celts were a tribal society that inhabited Europe during the early Iron Age (from1200 BC to 400 AD) and later migrated to Ireland, the Iberian Peninsula, Galatia and Scotland.
  They celebrated the ancient holiday Samhain, pronounced like “sowen,” on Oct. 31. The Celts said that this was the day when lines between the living world and the spirit world became blurred, with the dead walking in search of bodies to possess. In order to protect themselves from these spirits, Celts would disguise themselves as fellow ghouls and put out food and wine to appease the dead.
  Samhain was altered when the Roman Empire took over the Celts and adapted the holiday with a festival to celebrate Pomona, the goddess of fruit, trees and gardens, and since the apple was used to represent Pomona, some believe that this is the origin of bobbing for apples.
  The name Halloween was taken from the Catholic holiday All Saints Day or All Hallows on Nov. 1; thus, Oct 31 was All Hallows Eve or Hallowe’en. It is often speculated that All Saints Day was moved to Nov. 1 in order to discourage the celebration of Samhain, a pagan holiday.
  During the great potato famine many Irish immigrated to the United States, and as descendants of the Celts, brought traditions of Halloween with them. Trick-or-treating came from the way children would dress up as ghouls and goblins and ask neighbors for food and money or play practical jokes like ding-dong door ditch. Trick-or-treating became popular as an inexpensive way to have fun, with neighbors giving out candy in hopes of avoiding having any tricks played out on them.halloween
  Although Halloween is celebrated similarly in the United States and Canada, other countries celebrate the month of October separately. For example, Albanians celebrate Innocent’s Day; Indians celebrate Diwali; and those in Hong Kong celebrate National Day of the People’s Republic of China. Although many feel that Halloween is a dark time of the year, perhaps it is only because they misunderstand its origins.

ON THE HUNT: LHS STUDENTS AND FACULTY

By Angelina Folchi
Features Reporter

  A small number of students and faculty at LHS take pleasure in tracking and shooting different kinds of animals. There are different seasons for each animal, so they stay busy all year long.
Dino Marinoni is one teacher at LHS who enjoys hunting as a side interest. He goes hunting all the time with his brother and father and sometimes by himself. It’s a secret where he looks for the animals, because he wouldn’t want others to steal all the good spots, he said.
  Marinoni hunts many creatures, including grouse, chukar, mountain quail, pheasant, doves, deer and antelope. On the subject of antelope, Marinoni stated, “I got drawn this year. It was the first time ever.” With his Remington model 742 30.06 by good fortune, he got one. Measuring from the base of the horns, all the way to the back, the horns were 14 inches long. To shoot the birds, he uses his 12-gauge shotgun.
  Luckily, Marinoni drew hunting zone X6A for deer season, which is around Susanville and Diamond Mountain. The hunting in this zone opened Oct. 5. He hunted quite often, but he rarely saw does, let alone a nice buck. X6A closed Oct. 18, leaving Marinoni without a deer.
  Bradley Truhett, a senior this year, is also fond of hunting. Almost every weekend, unless there is something important going on, Truhett and his dad wake up around 5:30 a.m. and hunt until it’s dark. Occasionally, his uncle and cousin come with them. They cover the land all around Loyalton and the Sierra Valley, always heading somewhere new.
IMG_1027  About four weeks ago, Truhett shot a forked-horn buck in Jackson Meadows with his 243 that he always uses for big game. Even though it wasn’t the biggest deer he’s ever killed, it was big enough.
  Truhett hunts other animals too, including bear, quail, ducks, geese and rabbits. In fact, he killed a duck and a quail just last week. Truhett has a good time hunting. He stated, “I just enjoy the outdoors.”
  Senior Justin Holland has been hunting since he was twelve, but he took the hunter safety course when he was six or seven from John Mikulak.
  With his dad and brother, Holland goes hunting anywhere and everywhere. About once a week, he heads out early in the morning with the hopes of getting a deer, bear or some type of bird.
  Holland managed to harvest a bear early on Oct. 17, and it weighed 200 pounds. It was a difficult shot, the bear being 350 yards away. Holland took the shot with his Remington 7 mm, making a clean kill.
  A small number of students and faculty at LHS take pleasure in tracking and shooting different kinds of animals. There are different seasons for each animal, so they stay busy all year long.
Dino Marinoni is one teacher at LHS who enjoys hunting as a side interest. He goes hunting all the time with his brother and father and sometimes by himself. It’s a secret where he looks for the animals, because he wouldn’t want others to steal all the good spots, he said.
  Marinoni hunts many creatures, including grouse, chukar, mountain quail, pheasant, doves, deer and antelope. On the subject of antelope, Marinoni stated, “I got drawn this year. It was the first time ever.” With his Remington model 742 30.06 by good fortune, he got one. Measuring from the base of the horns, all the way to the back, the horns were 14 inches long. To shoot the birds, he uses his 12-gauge shotgun.
  Luckily, Marinoni drew hunting zone X6A for deer season, which is around Susanville and Diamond Mountain. The hunting in this zone opened Oct. 5. He hunted quite often, but he rarely saw does, let alone a nice buck. X6A closed Oct. 18, leaving Marinoni without a deer.
  Bradley Truhett, a senior this year, is also fond of hunting. Almost every weekend, unless there is something important going on, Truhett and his dad wake up around 5:30 a.m. and hunt until it’s dark. Occasionally, his uncle and cousin come with them.   They cover the land all around Loyalton and the Sierra Valley, always heading somewhere new.
About four weeks ago, Truhett shot a forked-horn buck in Jackson Meadows with his 243 that he always uses for big game. Even though it wasn’t the biggest deer he’s ever killed, it was big enough.

Remington 7mm

Remington 7mm


  Truhett hunts other animals too, including bear, quail, ducks, geese and rabbits. In fact, he killed a duck and a quail just last week. Truhett has a good time hunting. He stated, “I just enjoy the outdoors.”
  Senior Justin Holland has been hunting since he was twelve, but he took the hunter safety course when he was six or seven from John Mikulak.
  With his dad and brother, Holland goes hunting anywhere and everywhere. About once a week, he heads out early in the morning with the hopes of getting a deer, bear or some type of bird.
  Holland managed to harvest a bear early on Oct. 17, and it weighed 200 pounds. It was a difficult shot, the bear being 350 yards away. Holland took the shot with his Remington 7 mm, making a clean kill.

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